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Unique Content Marketing ML091
Categories: Podcast
LET'S PARTNER UP AND MAXIMIZE YOUR FIRM


In this episode, Jim and Tyson interview Garrett Moon, CEO and co-founder of CoSchedule a calendar and mission control for your marketing team and strategy, and the author of the 10x Marketing Formula. They will go over his beginnings as an entrepreneur,the idea behind CoSchedule and how it can help your law firm, his book and a lot more!

 

Early times:
Before CoSchedule, Garret runned a Marketing Agency where they did marketing consulting, web design and some software costume development. And what they started seeing is a consistent pattern of marketing teams struggling to implement their day to day jobs. We had the urge to solve that problem…

His site: https://coschedule.com/
His book: https://10xmarketingformula.com/

CoSchedule and legal marketing:
Most people are doing content marketing, many of your competitors are already doing it in some form or fashion and so it gets harder and harder to stand out. We have to start thinking about taking our content to a next level to really stand out from the competition.

The book:
The idea of the book was to show how we were able to get results even though we were entering a crowded marketplace…

The formula:
The 10x Formula book is a series of formulas or things that you can do as a team or as an individual to find you own individual 10x opportunity to multiply what you are doing. Systems, content, traffic, growth, competitors.

If you are running a law firm, these are some things you could do to improve your marketing:
1st phase: Learn how to acquire traffic. Learn how to use your website to let people find you and see you. Learn how to publish.
1. Content. Do it up to 5 times a week.
2. Get that content into social media and email.
3. Every time you do a blog post send it out to your entire list.

2nd phase: Call to action. Use something that the user can take away. Every time a user visits your website or reads your content you are gonna be giving them tangible value, and in exchange for that value you are gonna gain an email and an audience member.

3rd phase: Turn that audience into paying customers. Build the trust first with the content.

The Mindset:
One of the most valuable things is learning to prioritize opportunities very well. Opportunities that have the ability to multiply your results as a business by 10 times and can provide you with significant growth.

Max Law Con: May 17th and 18th
http://maxlawcon.maximumlawyer.com/

Hacking’s Hack:
https://readitfor.me/
It’s a book summary service with an audio summary, a textual summary and a video summary!

Garrett’s Tip:
Learn to listen to audiobooks 1,5 times or 2 times faster! It is hard at first, but really valuable when you get used to it.

Tyson’s Tip:
List your done wells. Anything that move your goals forward an inch. Every day right them down. It will get you in the right mindset.

//

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The Maximum Lawyer Podcast. Partner up, and maximize your firm.

 

 

Resources:

 

Transcripts: Unique Content Marketing 

Garrett
But increasingly, in every industry, you know, doing content marketing versus not doing content marketing, most people are doing it. Many of your competitors are already doing it in some form or fashion. And so it gets harder and harder. I think as time goes on for that to stand out, we have just started thinking about taking our content to a next level, or, you know, adapting it in some way to really stand out from the competition.

Unknown Speaker
Run your law firm the right way. This is the maximum liar, podcast, podcast, your hosts, Jim hacking and Tyson metrics. Let’s partner up and maximize your firm.

Jim Hacking
Welcome to the show. You’re back on the maximum lawyer Podcast. I’m Jim hacking.

Tyson Mutrux
And I’m Tyson nutrix. What’s up, Jimmy? How you doing? Bud

Unknown Speaker
Eisen? How are you sir?

Tyson Mutrux
Doing great. Apparently, you’re doing great to get two new associates. It sounds like so that’s pretty awesome. Well, they

Jim Hacking
both have to sit for the bar in July, but we’re excited to have them one started last week. The other one starts tomorrow. And we’ve been onboarding them and getting them all squared away. So yeah, it’s exciting time.

Tyson Mutrux
Yeah, so lots of growth there. Speaking of growth, I’m gonna go ahead and introduce our guest for the week, who is Garrett moon. He’s the CEO and co founder of CO schedule, and in parentheses. It’s the web’s number one marketing calendar and mission control for your entire marketing team. He’s also the reason why we’re having him on here, the author of the 10x marketing formula, which he just launched March 27. If you want to reach him, you can get him at at Garrett underscore moon or find him on LinkedIn. Jimmy, I did not realize this, but he is a Cubs fan, which is just makes me want to get sick. So it’s just terrible. But welcome, Garrett. Hey,

Unknown Speaker
thanks for having me on the show. Now, I just want to clarify, I was a Cubs fan before 2016. So I suffered through the hard years I paid my dues. Fair enough. There’s a lot of new ones in the last couple years, I noticed that a lot of new Cubs fans. So

Jim Hacking
for sure. Garrett, it says in our notes that you grew up in rural North Dakota, how someone from North Dakota become a Cubs fan. I guess it’s WGN.

Garrett
I have family in Illinois. So I have my dad’s side of the family. He was there. So we visited Illinois every couple of years. And yeah, I mean, WGN had bought a lot of Cubs fans, for sure. I mean, they were on all the time.

Jim Hacking
So go ahead and tell us about your beginnings, how you started co schedule, what is CO schedule and sort of how did you find your way into the entrepreneurial space?

Garrett
Yeah, definitely. Well, co schedule is a marketing platform, a marketing tool, we you know, built a tool that helps marketers organize all the different projects that they’re working on, whether it’s blog posts, email, social media, all the different things that take up a marketer’s day, we put them all in one platform, we give our customers a really clear clean calendar that they can use to kind of understand everything their teams working on, manage all their projects, manage all their, their tasks, assignments, deadlines, all of those types of things in a single place. And the one thing that’s really cool that we do is we always, as often as possible, we try to eliminate the copy paste and some of the duplication of tools. So we have a lot of integrations with social networks, with email tools, and all these different things that really allows co scheduler become that mission control, one dashboard that you need for your entire marketing team. And that was really, it’s really kind of what we’ve been up to, for the last four or five years, we launched late 2013, and really got running early 2014. But my previous experience to that was actually running a marketing agency. So me and my co founder ran an agency where we were doing marketing, consulting, web design, some custom software development, and what we kind of see what we’re seeing was just this consistent pattern of, you know, marketing teams that were our clients struggling to implement their day to day jobs, just how do you manage, you know, the the channels and the messaging and all of the different things that come into a marketers life. And, you know, being software guys being marketing consultants, you know, we had this urge to solve that problem, we’d experienced a good a good portion of it ourselves as well. And so we started to building software to fill that need. And that became co schedule. And now we’ve been going for few years, or a team of 65 10,000 plus active customers and 100 plus different countries. So it’s going really well.

Tyson Mutrux
Here. We talked about editorial calendars on the podcast quite a bit. And I know co schedule is a lot more than that. But it’s it’s I guess, it’s very base, I would say probably is an editorial calendar. But there are probably hundreds of these products out there. What makes co schedule different. One of

Garrett
the things I find is that most which like most markers that we talked to what they’re using for an editorial calendar is probably a spreadsheet or maybe some sort of other type of, you know, calendaring tool like a Google Calendar or Outlook calendar or something like that. Those are probably the two most common so the third one is sort of this productivity tool. They might be using some sort of application to manage projects and to manage different things. And those might have a calendar button inside of them, like a Trello, or Asana or Basecamp, or those types of things. And that gets them somewhere. But the reality is, is that in a marketers life, and we talked about this internally all the time, in marketers life, there’s this different stage of project management, where it’s actually if there’s go live point, right, like, when is a message actually going to go live? When is a website, you know, going to actually get launched? When is, you know, when does this go public? When does this blog post go live was this email gets sent. And marketers work on this very nautical quite predictable, but very consistent type of schedule. So the calendar becomes a far more meaningful tool than just sort of the backdrop to what they’re doing. So you look at all of these different productivity tools, like the calendar systems, and those types of things. They’re just not valuable enough. They’re just not powerful enough, like a marketer needs something else they need to be able to see, you know, how are we promoting our brand? How are we, you know, going about our business? And what’s it look like this month? Where are gaps where, you know, where do we have opportunities. And so for a marketing it, and particularly the marketing team, when you’re working together like that, that calendar is everything, that visibility into what your marketing program is everything, that is your strategy, that is your competitive advantage. And so the counter has to be a lot more powerful and a lot more active. That means that, you know, we need to be embedding directly with the tools that marketers need to have at their fingertips at all times. That means we need to be, you know, offering analysis in terms of analytics, in terms of content analysis, you know, we look at, you know, how to write better headlines, how to write better email, subject lines, like all of those things come with CO schedule. So, you know, we we really take, I would say, we marry the best of social publishing, project management and the editorial calendar into that one place with those key integrations.

Jim Hacking
Garrett, I don’t know if you know much about our listeners, but most of our listeners are small, firm and solo law firms where it’s usually one person wearing many different hats, including having to do some of the marketing, talk to us a little bit. And we preach often on here about content marketing, and I know that you have written and talked a lot about the promise of content marketing, and sort of how it might not always come through and sort of the mistakes you see people make.

Garrett
Yeah, definitely, you know, content, I think, is something where, you know, it’s kind of got this ethos around it, we talk about it a lot that, hey, if you publish consistently, if you use that editorial calendar, and you get stuff out there a couple times a week, or once a week, or whatever your schedule is that, you know, traffic will just come like that’s, that’s what it’s going to take. And, you know, barring some, you know, picking some topics and maybe doing some basic SEO, key wording and stuff like that. And I think the thing about it is that like a few years ago, or even a couple years ago, like that actually did work. And that could really help folks stand out and even legal profession and stuff like it could you could help you stand out because there wasn’t that many people doing it. But increasingly, in every industry, you know, doing content marketing, versus not doing content marketing, most people are doing it, many of your competitors are already doing it in some form or fashion. And so it gets harder and harder. I think as time goes on for that to stand out. And I think we forget, you know, when we’re doing that publishing that not only is our content is that our marketing platform, right, but it actually has to be differentiated from our competition, we have to start thinking about taking our content to a next level, or, you know, adapting it in some way to really stand out from the competition. So the marketplace is just become very, very crowded and saturated, you’re not the only one in your field doing it anymore. Back in those days, it was easy to be successful with content. Now it’s gotten a lot lot harder.

Tyson Mutrux
Alright, Garrett, so you recently you wrote the 10x marketing formula. So we talked about what that is and why you wrote it?

Garrett
Yeah, I think the tennis marketing forum is really came out of this exact question, you know, that, you know, why is content marketing become becoming harder? Why am I not publishing the content? I’m doing the schedule and doing everything that they say, you know, why am I not seeing the results? And I think, you know, as a industry in marketing, or just as marketers, or people doing marketing as part of their day, we’re starting to look around and say, you know, where’s the ROI on this thing is this paying off? And schedule we’ve we’ve had this similar process, right, in order for our business to grow. In order for our audience to grow, we had to figure this out. We’ve built our entire business on content. You know, we started blogging and creating content on CO schedules website, actually, before we even wrote any code for our product, like we began with marketing. And so it’s been core to what we do. And it just kind of felt like it was time to really kind of tell that story and show how we were able to get results even though we are entering a crowded marketplace, right for marketing software marketing tools. Were far from the first company that started using their blog and content marketing as a way to grow their business. In fact, every single competitor we have was doing the exact same thing when we launch. So we had to learn how to kind of jump past that get ahead, differentiate ourselves. And we really felt like I really feel like I found some things along the way that our team really was able to lock on to, that allowed us to accelerate our growth. And we always talk about growth. And we always use this phrase 10x 10x Row 10 times girls, you know, how do you multiply your results? How do you multiply your customers, your income, your traffic, whatever it is, by 10 times, and we really found a system to kind of get that. And I felt like it was very applicable to any business. So you know, just looking at looking at that marketplace we talked about before, like, it’s just becoming crowded, we needed to put something in people’s hands that helps them break through and get past that. And that was the text marketing formula.

Jim Hacking
So talk a little bit about the formula itself, what is it? And how does it work?

Garrett
You know, I’m a startup founder. And so I really love to think about things and frameworks that are these repeatable concepts and ideas that you can use in many different areas of the company. And some of them are very marketing specific. And some of the ORS it’s kind of these more generic formula. So it’s not, it’s not a very specific, I say it’s a little bit more of a choose your own adventure, rather than as a specific plan. Because I think one of the things that I see happening a lot in marketing was this copycat marketing, right? We publish a blog post, like, here’s the 10 tips that you need to write better content, here’s the five things that you need to do, you know, in order to really get better results or something like that. And there’s a lot of like, very, you know, I would call them prescriptions like these very specific things that people are supposed to do. But at the end of the day, that copycat marketing, we’re just taking anybody else’s tips, we’re just taking everybody else’s strategies and making them our own, we’re really never going to actually differentiate ourselves. So really, the teknicks marketing formula is a series of formulas or a series of things that you can do as a team or as an individual, to find your own individual 10x opportunity that you can really use to multiply what you’re doing. And so I talked about brainstorming that coming up with content ideas, how to have a better system for how to choose one content idea over another, using a system that allows you to kind of start picking out the types of content that are going to give you bigger traffic and more growth process for how to look at your competitors through a new lens, and really understand what they’re doing. And then find ways to differentiate what you’re publishing and what your marketing team works on. So it’s really it’s a, it’s going to be a system that helps you kind of unlock that, because I think it needs to be different for everybody, we’ve kind of wanted to get away from these marketing books out there, where it’s just, hey, just do this. And you’ll be you’ll be sad, and really help people find something unique and powerful.

Tyson Mutrux
years, there’s a part where you talk about the competition free content, and then you kind of break it down, look, research and strategize. Can you sort of talk about that approach?

Garrett
Yeah, definitely. So competition free content is really one of those these kind of key ideas, I think, you know, that we opened up the book with and I really, we’re really talking about is this competitive landscape by compare it to a business book that some people may be familiar with called Blue Ocean Strategy. And what that book talks about in terms of differentiation is that there are kind of two oceans that your business can swim and you can, you can swim in the red ocean that’s bloody with competition, you can, meaning that you can do all the same things that everybody else is doing, you can offer the same features, you can offer the same services and use the same marketing techniques, and you can all fight each other. But the businesses that really break out are the ones that end up finding a blue ocean. And that means that they’re free of competition, because the strategies are using or the techniques are using the services are offering differentiate themselves in a very clear way. And competition free content is a way to sort of adapt that for marketers, and for content creators is to start thinking about your content itself, that blog post that you’re publishing, or that email that you’re writing, or even social messages, but how can those items themselves become the differentiating factor for your business? So I give a few examples of this in the book and I talk one of them I talked about is a company called groove HQ, which is a tool that does customer support software. So SAS companies like CO schedule, would hire groove to be the interface, the software interface between our customer, our customer support team, and our customers, so we can answer questions and respond back to them and so forth. And they were doing regular content marketing, right. They had a regular blog, they had 10,000 Plus email subscribers, they were, you know, posting helpful topics about how to do customer support, how to hire customer support agents, you know, all your typical things that you’d expect from a company like groove. And you know, they were plugging along right there was going okay. And you know, one day the CEO Alex emailed to Home Marketing team and said, our blog sucks. Let’s meet tomorrow At 10am we want it we need to fix this. And it’s kind of a shocking thing, right to hear that phrase, like our content sucks. Our blog sucks. We got it. We got to start it down. But what they ended up doing is actually shut down their entire air blog. They shut down the regular blog, and they started something completely different. Something that I would say was competition. Free. And what they did is they found something that they could offer the market in terms of their marketing, right, they could offer the market, they could offer their audience that no one else could do. And for them, that meant that they started blogging about their journey as a SaaS company, or software as a service company, going from $0 in revenue to $100,000 per month in monthly reoccurring revenue. And they were going to have this, they launched their website with his little meter at the bottom of every single page that said, Here’s how far we are on that journey. And our commitment to you is that we’re going to talk about it the whole way, we’re going to tell you, how we grew, we’re going to tell you about product decisions, we’re making sure to tell you about, you know, financing. And, you know, when we decided to raise money and how we went about it, and they just kind of opened up the books, and they had this huge amount of transparency into what they were doing as a business. And I’m not advocating it, everyone does that right. But what I’m saying is that for group, that was a really amazing turning point for them, they got 5000 new email subscribers in like a week. And so you know, it was a massive growth index. Plus, it really differentiated them because there’s no one else that could tell the growth story like, right, no one else was willing to do it and allow them to kind of leapfrog that competition and do something very, very different just with the types of content that they were willing to publish.

Jim Hacking
Alright, Garrett. So let’s do a thought experiment. A young personal injury attorney has stumbled into your office in North Dakota says, I have a little personal injury law firm in St. Louis. I handle car accidents, I handle slip and falls, I handle some other products, liability type cases. I don’t know much about marketing. I understand the content marketing is important. I’ve seen them lead magnets on other websites. And I sort of understand that conceptually, how would you walk them through what they need to be thinking?

Garrett
Sure, this attorney have any web presence at all to start with? Are

Jim Hacking
we going to start from scratch? Yeah, let’s just say they have a sort of a generic website with like 10 pages on it with like one practice area on each page.

Garrett
Yeah, so I think there’s there’s two phases to it, right. And actually, I kind of break it down in the book, I start thinking about three different phases to growth. But the first one I would say is they just have to learn how to acquire traffic, like they live to learn how to use their website as a way to get people to find them and see them. And so that does, you know, we’re looking at content and how content can be helpful to that. I mean, content will have a deep reach into Google and SEO, it will have value on social, it also gives you a valuable weapon. And in or something you can use your content you can use for email. And so the first part of that is just like learning to publish two to three times a week or once a week. In the beginning, I would say do it more up to five times a week, if you can, you can swing it. And just start establishing yourself as a thought leader is very, very simply going to publish regularly and learn how to use that content to acquire traffic. So getting it on social networks, getting an email list, making sure you’re sending every single time you publish a blog post, you send that email to your entire list, don’t do the weekly digest things, send the email directly. And those are just kind of the early early steps, like you just have to kind of get the mechanics down and get into the habit of like, how’s this content going to your created, how’s it going to get out there and when it gets out there, what’s it going to do? Once you’ve started to do that, you really need to start shifting your focus and thinking about list building and acquiring an audience. And you need to get more aggressive with your calls to action on your site. In a co schedule. For example, we give away a lot of we call them cookies or content resources that people can download. So every single blog post, we publish, as a downloadable PDF or downloadable Excel spreadsheet, you know, something that the user can take away. And what that does is it means that in every case, when somebody visits your site to read a blog post or piece of content, you’re going to be delivering them with tangible value, there’s something that they can take away. And in exchange for that value, they’re going to give you an email address, and you’re going to gain an audience member. And that process, those two phases, right there can take years. So you know, to really start getting through but but you’ve got to learn how to do that you’ve got to learn how to build traffic. And then you’ve got to learn how to build that email list. So those are kind of the two the two standard tangible steps after that the third phase, it gets more technical, and it gets more into, okay, how do we really get good at turning these audience members into paying customers in some way? Like how do we kind of turn them into leads or sales, that type of thing? And I think that’s fine. That’s good. I think a lot of folks try to jump to that right away without learning how to build traffic without learning how to build an audience. And I think that gets them into trouble. And it’s kind of why they don’t see see the results right away. But those are the two core skills. I think competition free content is the sort of lens that you need to look at when you’re publishing content, right? Like what what can you provide your audience that’s going to be unique, help you stand out and kind of be that difference maker. That’s a slightly different process. We go through that in the book as well, but you that’s kind of something you’re doing in parallel to both the growth phase and then the rd acquisition phase.

Tyson Mutrux
So Garrett, you call them cookies. We it’s something we call lead magnets. They’re called a bunch of different things. I guess from a law firms perspective, what what are some things that you’ve seen where the cookies or lead magnets that are working these days? Because it used to be, you know, you put a book, you give away a book, and now that some people are saying, No, don’t do that anymore. So they’re saying give out a tip sheet or things like that? Are there certain things that are converting more than others?

Garrett
I mean, versus like an ebook. Right, exactly.

Tyson Mutrux
What are working these days?

Garrett
Yeah, I think it depends a little bit on your audience, you know, at cosca, we really liked we kind of always brand ourselves is very actionable. We always think that like we want our every piece of content we produce to be something that you could take action on, like, you could literally stop halfway through the post and begin implementing this into your business. And that’s always a really important kind of key concept, key differentiator for our content, it’s kind of part of what we consider our own competition free content is actionability. So for us, that means I like plant like Excel spreadsheets like blank Excel spreadsheets, that are like kind of planning documents that people can use for strategy or for you know, even paper, we, we have a paper and a Excel spreadsheet version have an editorial calendar that you can download and use, if you don’t want to go digital right away, you know, we have we have that available. And so like, those types of very actionable tangible pieces seem very useful. And then, and people really enjoy those, they can, you know, read the post to understand how to use them, why use them, and then download the Excel spreadsheet and start implementing it right for themselves. That’s been really good. But even things like just worksheets, you know, just the PDF worksheets that they can kind of fill out, you know, can work as well doesn’t have to be a full spreadsheet. But those types of actionable things I tend to really like because they help connect and add deeper value to the content rather than just providing another piece of content, right? Like an ebook. You’re saying, okay, read this whole blog post, and then also read this whole book. And it’s, it’s hard to commit to an ebook, How many ebooks have we all downloaded that we’ve never even read and never even used. But if you’re reading a blog post, and you have an actionable worksheet right next to it, you can download it and you can kind of start comparing them side by side, you may at least may start, you know, has hashing out some thoughts on that spreadsheet, that can be a very, very powerful, very quick turnaround. So those types of things, very actionable pieces have done really well for us.

Jim Hacking
Here, talk to us a little bit about mindset, when you talk to your clients about, about marketing and messaging and all that stuff. What what are you telling them? As far as they should have in frame of mind? Like, what should they be thinking about? What should they be trying to achieve? And sort of what’s your thoughts on that?

Garrett
I think one of the most valuable things is just really learning how to prioritize opportunities really well. One of the concepts, you know, in the book that I cover is 10x versus 10%. And I kind of touched on it earlier, but we really want to do as a marketer is you want to constantly be working on 10x opportunities, you know, opportunities that have the ability to multiply the results as a business by 10 times, right, that can provide you with significant and changing growth to your email list to your bottom line, you know, where, you know, wherever you’re going to be looking at that. And I can contrast that to some of the things that we ended up spending a lot of time on as marketers or people doing marketing, which are these 10% opportunities. And so I think, you know, learning to distinguish those two things, is the mindset around co schedule, you’re gonna hear on a daily basis across all of our teams, not just our marketing team, but you’re gonna have people saying things like, is that a 10x? Opportunity? And it’s just a question that we’ve kind of learned culturally, to ask ourselves and ask our teams to just really start to think about like, is, are we really working on something big and transformational here? Or are we making little tweaks and little improvements? Right? Are we doing something that will, for sure, make our product better make our content better? But just a little bit beside that 10% improvement? Or are we are we doing something that’s transformational, that has the ability to bring about big results. In the book, I go through this whole process on how to find 10x opportunities, that entire brainstorming process that you can do as a team or as an individual. And really, it comes down to picking that big 10x goal and then working backwards, you know, what ideas do we have that could help us achieve this goal in X amount of time, and then really learning to evaluate which ones are 10x opportunities, which ones are 10% opportunities, and just pushing the 10% ones out the door, we just we just don’t focus on those types of things. And that could very well include, you know, extra proofreading, or could very well include extra time spent on, you know, on graphics or certain types of things where, you know, they may just not be that important, or one a big one in particular is social media. There’s a lot of time you can spend tweaking and fiddling with social media. And the reality is, a lot of the work that we do on social is 10% activity at best, but it often gets a disproportionate amount of our time. So you’ve really got to learn how to balance those type things and make the right trade offs.

Tyson Mutrux
Here I think that the whole tenant idea can somewhat be hard to conceptualize. So can you give everyone an example of what a 10x idea would be compared to what a 10% idea might be?

Garrett
Well, sure, I’ll start with a 10% idea that I’m, you know, fairly well known for around the office. And that is, we don’t correct typos on our blog posts. If something goes out on a co scheduled blog with a typo, or even if the typo is in like the header graphic, we don’t ever go back and fix it, users will email us and they’ll let us know those messages on Twitter, they’ll say, Hey, you spelled this word wrong, or this is grammatically incorrect. And they’re right, that’s fine. But we choose not to go back and fix it. And it sounds a bit extreme. But I’ve always kind of put that into the 10% category, right? Like that is a thing that we could do that would technically make our blog posts 10% better, right? But is it really transformational? Is it really going to help us get more clicks? Is it really going to help us get more customers. And the reality is, it’s just not, it’s just going to be busy work, it’s just going to be something that takes time, but doesn’t really deliver us any tangible results. And so one way to think about that is, in a 10x brainstorm, what I like to do is say, Okay, let’s pick a goal. Let’s pick a timeline. And let’s figure out how we can how we can get there. So we say, before a team would get together. Or you could even do this individually, just on your own on a piece of paper, and just say, in order to let me say, what would we need to do? What’s something we could do that would help double our blog subscribers in the next three months, right, let’s say you’re at 6000 box subscribers, and we’re going to figure out how to get to 12,000. In a three month time, you just ask yourself that question. And everyone who’s going to come to this brainstorm in this meeting is going to, before they get to the meeting, start developing a bunch of ideas, it’s every idea that they can think of that could help us do that job, right, going from six to 12,000, in three months. So it’s a very focused type of brainstorm. If you’re doing this individually, you just open up a Google Doc or something, and you just start typing out ideas based on that idea, that theory and come to the team meeting, or you go out and do it individually, you stick all those things up on the board, on a post it note every single idea. And maybe it’s like, Hey, we’re going to publish three times per week, instead of one, we’re going to publish two extra pieces of content per week, we are going to start doing video or we’re going to start doing publishing on YouTube, we’re going to you know, write 25 different headlines and do our a, some A B testing on headlines and try to get better traffic based on headlines, you can have all these different ideas that you might come up with, in order to do that, that job, put them on the board. And it kind of this kind of this free time, you don’t really a judge or evaluate the idea, you just get them up there. The next thing I like to do is actually prioritize them based on the amount of work it’s going to take. So basically just saying, Okay, give it a one, on the corner of the post it note, if it’s something that can be implemented in a week or less, give it a to have, it’s going to take at least two weeks and give it a three if it’s going to take three weeks or more. Right. So like a really large project. So you may have had this idea that says, hey, we’re going to redesign our blog, and it’s going to look nicer. Well, that’s definitely a three, right, that’s going to take you a long time. But you know, something I talked about before, you know, might be just a one, we’re gonna write 25 headlines for every piece of content and do a big headline testing. So one, you can start doing that in a week. But the motherboard, and then what you just go through is you just look at every single note and you say ask yourself, and you discuss it as a team, like does this project is this opportunity have the ability to multiply our results by 10 times? Like, is it possible? Is it there? And there’s going to be some clear yeses, and there’s going to be a lot of noes that you’re going to go through. And basically, once you’re done with this brainstorm, you should be able to say, okay, all these 10x ideas that are a one, we should do them right now, there’s no reason to say that we aren’t going to implement them, or at least a couple of them by the end of the week, choose we’re going to put on the kind of up next list and threes are going to put on the backburner and we’re going to come to them. Or maybe we’re going to do one per quarter or something like that. But those ideas, those kind of unlocking things, sort of startups just start to prioritize themselves. And I think that’s where that growth mindset comes in. Like if there’s something that has the opportunity to give us big results, and that we could implement in less than five days. Like that’s what we want to be doing. That’s what we should be doing. And the 25 Headlines per blog post with a B testing of headlines like that is one that CO schedule use. That’s an example from one of our brainstorms. And it was like this is so easy and simple. And if we do this repeatedly with every single post we write we were at that time, I think we’re posting about three posts, you know, the amount we can learn about headlines and the amount of data we can have about how to write good headlines and the amount of traffic we can get from that really can make a big difference for us. That was one thing that we implemented right away.

Jim Hacking
I love that idea about everyone bringing ideas to the meetings and put them up on the post it notes. That’s great. One of the things that I wanted to ask you was What is it been like experiencing growth in your company? I know your company is one of the fastest growing companies in North Dakota. Talk to us a little bit about how you scaled how you knew when to scale and what that process has been like.

Garrett
Yeah, I think you always feel like you should have done it six months ago, three to six months ago. It’s sort of like, we get to these phases as a company in particular, I talked about growth, thinking right now, but just hiring and growing the team, and like, when do we know, some of those types of things, it’s just sort of you get to these, these phases, where it’s like, everything feels like it’s broken, right, or everything feels like it’s not operating at efficiency, or a can’t ever do enough to catch up with where you need to go. And those are, those are the kinds of situations where we, you know, as a company just kind of stepped back and say, Okay, well, we need to really add a bunch of resources. So you know, we’re gonna do a bunch of hiring, we might raise some money, there’s all these different pieces that come from that. But the thing that’s always interesting to me is that you kind of go through this, like, very predictable phase where everything’s good for a while, all of a sudden, it feels like everything’s broken, and you’re behind, you’re a million miles behind, you raise money, you add the team, and then all of a sudden, everything’s broken, again, because all of the processes, all of the things that worked before, no longer work, you know, certain like just how teams communicate our meeting structures on a weekly basis, you know, how, you know, different departments and different, you know, heads of departments communicate, all that stuff changes. And so then you kind of fix all that, and then you like, then things are good for a while for another three, six months, then you kind of start the whole process all over again. And I think, for me, like, the one thing that’s been really useful or necessary, and I think it’s why I talked about before, like these, these sort of like, just simple things that you can take with you, for all of these teams, you know, that 10x versus 10%. Like, that’s a concept that works really, really well for our marketing team. But it also works really well when we’re making product based decisions, what feature to build, right, where are 10x features versus, or 10% features, you know, where are 10x features that help current users do their work 10 times better versus 10% better. So that’s very, that’s very useful. And we can kind of take that into different places. A reverse example of that is our product team that builds our product and our engineering and software team. They use agile as a methodology for how they go about programming, how they build software. And we’ve actually applied a lot of those thinking a lot of that principle in that meeting structure to how we’ve grown, our marketing teams, our customer support teams. And that’s, you know, those that simple framework thing that I talked about before, like those types of things really become necessary. When you’re growing quickly, you got to, you’ve got to find just really simple ideas that have a lot of value and power over time.

Tyson Mutrux
You’ve given us a ton of information, a lot of good nuggets that are hidden away in there, too, which I think is fantastic. We are going to wrap up, we want to be respectful of your time. Before I do, though, and I want to remind everyone to go to the Facebook group, get involved there, there’s a ton of engagement going on every single day. It’s a lot of great information being spread around. So I shared you in there. And then if you don’t mind, please go to iTunes or wherever get your podcast give us a five star review, and help spread the love. And Jimmy, what’s your hack of the week.

Jim Hacking
So for my hack of the week, it’s a program that my brother in law taught me about when we were in Las Vegas last week. It’s called Read It For Me. So it’s one of these books, summary services, but it does things a little bit differently. It has an audio summary. It has a textual summary, and it also has a little video summary where they walk through the major concepts of the book. I know a lot of our listeners don’t have a lot of time and a lot of books, a lot of business books, I’m sure not Garrett’s book, but a lot of books get repetitive. And I think that this service distills it all down. So just started playing around with it, but I really like it.

Tyson Mutrux
That’s a really good one. Very good. What’s the name of it again,

Jim Hacking
it’s Read It For Me. So R EA D, it fo r.me There’s an aggregate.

Tyson Mutrux
Alright, so Garrett, I don’t think we told you in advance. So I apologize. But we always ask our guests to give one tip, it can be a book, it can be a podcast can be a blog, it can be a product, anything you want. One tip that can help move their law firms forward. So you have a tip for us.

Garrett
You know, I think one tip that I would have is kind of staying on the same theme of, you know, how do you get through content faster? And how do you summarize it, if you know I’ve been an audible listener for years, hundreds of books on there. And I think learning to listen to audiobooks at one and a half, two times the speed. It’s hard at first but boy is it a really valuable skill once you can get it so that’d be my tip is audible, get that subscription and crank that speed up as fast as you can tolerate it and keep going a little bit because you can really digest a lot of content and big ideas that way very, very quickly. It’s even helped me listen to a few books that are really transformational. I think just multiple times where you’re out exercising or mowing the grass or doing dishes you know there’s always those downtimes where you can make it that kind of stuff work.

Tyson Mutrux
That is such a really good one because I went through one it was a 10 hour book not too long ago and then I started messing with the numbers went one and a half speed and did twice as fast speed. It it’s crazy. You can see actually how much time it saves you because it automatically adjust for you. It really is a good tip. So that’s a good one. My tip of the week is so our new coach has has us filling out the success log each day. And it’s really to focus on our process goals so we can achieve our product goals. But one of the key parts that I think is really transformational is the first thing we’re supposed to do is list our done wells. And that’s, you know, three things that we’ve done well in the last 24 hours, and it’s anything that moves your goals forward an inch, anything. So because it’s really to get into that positive mindset. And I will tell you, it really is transformational once you’re doing it every day. And it gets your mind right from the very beginning of the day. So my my tip of the week is to list every day, write them down, don’t just say them in your head, actually write them down. Three things that you’ve done in the previous 24 hours to help move the ball forward. And I will tell you it really it is great. It starts your day off very well get you in that right mindset. So I recommend it. Garrett, thank you so much for coming on. This was a great episode. We really appreciate you coming on. So thank you very much.

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